iOS, Twitter, Local SEO, More: Tuesday Evening ResearchBuzz, October 22, 2019

https://researchbuzz.me/2019/10/22/ios-twitter-local-seo-more-tuesday-evening-researchbuzz-october-22-2019/

http://researchbuzz.me/?p=16685

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

BetaNews: Apple warns users to upgrade their old iPhones and iPads or face GPS and time issues. “Apple has issued a warning to owners of some iPhones and iPads, advising them to update their operating system within the next two weeks. The company warns that devices that do not upgrade iOS will experience problems with GPS and incorrect date and times — which in turn could cause problems with iCloud, email and other services.”

CNET: Twitter planning policy changes to help combat deepfakes. “Twitter said Monday it’s going to make policy changes around how it deals with manipulated videos such as deepfakes and it’s asking the public for help.”

USEFUL STUFF

Search Engine Journal: A 50-Point Audit for Getting Started with Local SEO. “Local SEO ranking factors are still a black box for many companies that value local traffic. Nobody actually knows what Google values. But studies and experience can reveal what is having an impact on ranking and placing in the coveted local pack.” VERY thorough. If you have any kind of physical presence that requires a listing on Google Maps, I recommend you at least read through this list.

Hongkiat: 10 Gmail Chrome Extensions You Should Know. “I have a love-hate relationship with the new, refreshed version of Gmail. Though I admire its material design interface, I’m not a fan of every design change that led to its modern interface; the interface feels more crowded than the old interface. So, the question arises: how to customize or simplify Gmail?”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

The Verge: Twitch CEO Emmett Shear on how moderation creates communities. “At this year’s TwitchCon in San Diego — a celebratory, over-the-top affair that brought in streamers and fans from all over the world — I sat down with Twitch CEO Emmett Shear who co-founded the first iteration of the site and who’s been steering the ship ever since 2011.”

iFixit: Rebble with a Cause: How Pebble Watches Were Granted an Amazing Afterlife. “In the early summer of 2018, you could buy an Apple Watch with built-in GPS, wireless payments, and speakers that buzz water out after a swim. Meanwhile, Katharine Berry was hustling to keep five-year-old watches with black and white screens alive.”

SECURITY & LEGAL

The New York Times: Using Old Cellphones to Listen for Illegal Loggers. ” This village in West Sumatra, a lush province of volcanoes and hilly rainforests, had a problem with illegal loggers…. So, residents asked a local environmental group for camera traps or some other equipment that might help. In July, they got more than they expected: a treetop surveillance system that uses recycled cellphones and artificial intelligence software to listen for rogue loggers and catch them in the act.”

CBS News: Cybercriminals are doing big business in the gaming chat app Discord. “Cybercriminals have set up shop on Discord, a popular chat application for gamers with more than 250 million active users. Hackers have modified many of the app’s private groups to function like retail shops that sell illicit products, including stolen credit card numbers, cracked customer accounts for Delta Air Lines and Hilton Hotels, as well as malware that can be used to infect computer networks. ”

RESEARCH & OPINION

New Indian Express: Fake news shared over two million times on social media during Lok Sabha polls. “About 50,000 fake news stories were published during the recent Lok Sabha elections and shared 2 million times, according to a study conducted by fact-checking startup Logically. The firm, which has bases in Mysuru in Karnataka and also in the UK, was even able to track down some fake stories all the way to Chinese and Pakistani IP addresses.”

Phys .org: Big data, artificial intelligence to support research on harmful blue-green algae. “A team of scientists from research centers stretching from Maine to South Carolina will develop and deploy high-tech tools to explore cyanobacteria in lakes across the East Coast. The multi-year project will combine big data, artificial intelligence and robotics with new and time-tested techniques for lake sampling to understand where, when, and how cyanobacterial blooms develop.” Good evening, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Wayback Machine, Facebook, Twitter, More: Tuesday Afternoon ResearchBuzz, October 22, 2019

https://researchbuzz.me/2019/10/22/wayback-machine-facebook-twitter-more-tuesday-afternoon-researchbuzz-october-22-2019/

http://researchbuzz.me/?p=16680

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Internet Archive: The Wayback Machine: Fighting Digital Extinction in New Ways. “The average web page might last three months before it’s altered or deleted forever. You never know when access to the information on these web pages is going to be needed. It might be three months from now; it might be three decades. That’s how the Wayback Machine serves—making history by saving history. Now, the Wayback Machine is fighting digital extinction in brand new ways.”

Ars Technica: Facebook promises to beef up “election integrity” efforts heading into 2020. “With 379 long, long days to go until the 2020 US presidential election, Facebook is promising to do a better job than it did in 2016 of preventing bad actors, both foreign and domestic, from abusing its platform to potentially affect the outcome. The company unveiled a slew of ‘election integrity efforts’ today, saying the measures will ‘help protect the democratic process’ by identifying threats, closing vulnerabilities, and reducing ‘the spread of viral misinformation and fake accounts.'”

Mashable: Facebook will ban ads that discourage people from voting. “Voter suppression is a term that describes efforts to prevent people from voting by spreading anti-voting sentiment, sharing incorrect information about how to vote, and even undermining get out the vote efforts and voting infrastructure. Now, Facebook will outright prohibit ads that discourage people from voting. For example, Facebook wouldn’t allow someone to publish an ad that suggests that voting is pointless.” Because pointing out that the platform from which 43% of American citizens get their news is totally okay with running lies as political ads is not a cogent argument that voting is useless. Or is it?

USEFUL STUFF

Lifehacker: How to Create a Lurker Twitter Account Like Mitt Romney’s. “If you’re on Twitter, you’ve probably heard about Senator Mitt Romney’s secret Twitter account, in which he called himself ‘Pierre Delecto’ and kept track of his kids as well as journalists, political associates, and a handful of celebrities. If your response to Romney’s fifteen extra minutes of fame was “Huh, I could use an account like that,” here’s how you set it up.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Wired: How Meme Culture Changed the PSAT. “Thank you for coming and welcome to the College Board’s Preliminary SAT and National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test, the internet age edition. You must bring two No. 2 pencils, a photo ID, and an approved calculator. You must not smuggle in a protractor, or scarf down a sandwich, or post memes on Twitter that reveal test content. No, really: The penalty for such illicit memes could be the cancellation of your test score.”

New York Times: When the Student Newspaper Is the Only Daily Paper in Town. “As more than 2,000 newspapers across the country have closed or merged, student journalists from Michigan to Arizona have stepped in to fill the void.”

SECURITY & LEGAL

Digital Trends: Google VP says guests should be informed if you have smart devices in the home. “Consumer privacy is a tightrope act that no company has quite managed to nail down and that some seem to have given up on. In a recent interview with the BBC that followed Google’s event in New York, Rick Osterloh, the senior vice president of devices and services, said that homeowners might want to consider disclosing the presence of smart devices before they invite guests into their home.”

CNET: Georgia’s Supreme Court issues a landmark decision on vehicle data privacy. “Back in 2014, a man named Victor Mobley was driving his 2014 Dodge Charger along a tree-lined road in Henry County, Georgia. Two people in a 1999 Chevrolet Corvette pulled out from a driveway and were hit by Mobley. They died, and Mobley survived.”

RESEARCH & OPINION

Mississippi State University: New Publication Considers the Intersection of Google Searches and Crime Prevention. “How many times a day do you turn to Google for a question? With 98% of American adults using the Internet daily, Google has also become a common part of our searches for information. So, how does this turn to Google affect our lives and communities? SSRC scientists with the Innovative Data laboratory are asking this same question concerning searches about crime in the recent paper ‘Searching for Safety: Crime Prevention in the Era of Google.'”

EurekAlert: Data mining applied to scholarly publications to finally reveal Earth’s biodiversity. “The Biodiversity Literature Repository (BLR), a joint project of Plazi, Pensoft and Zenodo at CERN, takes on the challenge to open up the access to the data trapped in scientific publications, and find out how many species we know so far, what are their most important characteristics (also referred to as descriptions or taxonomic treatments), and how they look on various images. To do so, BLR uses highly standardised formats and terminology, typical for scientific publications, to discover and extract data from text written primarily for human consumption.” Good afternoon, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Imgur, Internet Archive, Twitch, More: Tuesday ResearchBuzz, October 22, 2019

https://researchbuzz.me/2019/10/22/imgur-internet-archive-twitch-more-tuesday-researchbuzz-october-22-2019/

http://researchbuzz.me/?p=16675

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

The Verge: Imgur won’t support Reddit’s NSFW communities anymore because they put its ‘business at risk’. “In a blog post published earlier this week, image-sharing site Imgur wrote that it won’t display any content from Reddit’s NSFW communities on its site.”

Internet Archive: Adding New Features to the Internet Archive Music Experience. “Our online digital library is best known for its immense archive of web pages and websites in the Wayback Machines. Less well known are the million-plus recordings the site has stored digitally and made available to the general public, mostly from 78s, albums and CDs. Highlighting the growing importance of music on archive.org is the debut this month of our new music player.”

Engadget: Twitch ‘Watch Parties’ let streamers watch Prime Video with viewers . “Twitch has started testing a new feature that allows streamers to watch Prime Video with their viewers — as long as they’re also subscribers. Travis Shreffler, a content creator and author, has tweeted an email he received from Prime Video, inviting him to test a new feature called Watch Parties.”

USEFUL STUFF

Hongkiat: Best 5 Security Apps for your Smartphone for 2019 . “There are mobile security apps that help protect your mobile device — be it running Android or iOS. However, it’s not easy to choose one of them because of their varied features, interface, and support for mobile operating systems. In this write-up, I’ve compiled the best mobile security apps depending on their interface, security features, and their reputation. Let’s check them out.”

How-To Geek: Filter Google Sheets Data without Changing What Collaborators See. “Filters in Google Sheets let you analyze data in your document by showing only the things you want. However, it changes how others see the document, too. Here’s how to use filter views to leave each collaborator’s view unchanged.”

Lifehacker: How to Make the Internet Less Depressing. “The like button ruined the internet. Social media and comment sections have trained us to channel our negative feelings into words, and our positive feelings into likes. So negativity is laid out in detail in the comments and replies, while positivity is compressed into a number. Scrolling through it all, or having it happen to something you post, is exhausting. The solution is simple.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Seattle Times: New Facebook oversight board results to be public, exec says. “A new quasi-independent oversight board will soon make decisions on some of the most difficult questions on what material belongs on Facebook’s platform in a ‘very public way,’ an executive for the social-media company said Friday.”

New York Times: High Schools to TikTok: We’re Catching Feelings. “On the wall of a classroom that is home to the West Orange High School TikTok club, large loopy words are scrawled across a whiteboard: ‘Wanna be TikTok famous? Join TikTok club.’ It’s working. “There’s a lot of TikTok-famous kids at our school,” said Amanda DiCastro, who is 14 and a freshman. “Probably 20 people have gotten famous off random things.””

BuzzFeed News: Porn Stars Vs. Instagram: Inside The Battle To Remain On The Platform. “Porn stars and other sex workers are furious that Instagram continues to take down their accounts with confusing guidelines and explanations — and despite a summer meeting where actors’ union representatives and platform officials tried to hammer out their differences.”

SECURITY & LEGAL

Wired: Stealthy Russian Hacker Group Resurfaces With Clever New Tricks. “In the notorious 2016 breach of the Democratic National Committee, the group of Russian hackers known as Fancy Bear stole the show, leaking the emails and documents they had obtained in a brazen campaign to sway the results of the US presidential election. But another, far quieter band of Kremlin hackers was inside DNC networks as well. In the three years since, that second group has largely gone dark—until security researchers spotted them in the midst of another spy campaign, one that continued undetected for as long as six years.”

Ars Technica: Alexa and Google Home abused to eavesdrop and phish passwords. “By now, the privacy threats posed by Amazon Alexa and Google Home are common knowledge. Workers for both companies routinely listen to audio of users—recordings of which can be kept forever—and the sounds the devices capture can be used in criminal trials. Now, there’s a new concern: malicious apps developed by third parties and hosted by Amazon or Google. The threat isn’t just theoretical.”

RESEARCH & OPINION

Newswise: Museums Put Ancient DNA to Work for Wildlife. “Scientists who are trying to save species at the brink of extinction are finding help in an unexpected place. Heather Farrington, curator of zoology for the Cincinnati Museum Center, is using DNA from specimens collected more than 100 years ago to help understand the evolution and stresses faced by today’s animals.” Good morning, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Chicago Teachers’ Strike, WordPress, Firefox Reality, More: Monday Evening ResearchBuzz, October 21,

https://researchbuzz.me/2019/10/21/chicago-teachers-strike-wordpress-firefox-reality-more-monday-evening-researchbuzz-october-21-2019/

http://researchbuzz.me/?p=16671

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Larry Ferlazzo: Updated Resources On The Chicago Teachers’ Strike. “Here are new additions to THE BEST ARTICLES & VIDEOS FOR LEARNING ABOUT THE 2019 CHICAGO TEACHERS’ STRIKE.”

The first WordPress 5.3 release candidate is now available. “WordPress 5.3 expands and refines the Block Editor introduced in WordPress 5.0 with new blocks, more intuitive interactions, and improved accessibility. New features in the editor increase design freedoms, provide additional layout options and style variations to allow designers complete control over the look of a site.” I have been successfully avoiding the block editor so far…

Mozilla Mixed Reality Blog: Firefox Reality Top Picks – Bringing You New Virtual Reality Experiences Weekly. “So you bought yourself a fancy VR headset, you’ve played all the zombie-dragon-laser-kitten-battle games (we have too!) and now you’re wondering… what else is there? Where can I find other cool stuff to explore while I have this headset strapped to my face? We felt the same way, so we built Firefox Reality to help you in your quest for the most interesting, groundbreaking and entertaining virtual reality content on the Web.”

USEFUL STUFF

Hongkiat: How to Improve Writing Quality with Data Storytelling. “In our interconnected, globalized world, there’s a more significant need than ever for the kind of human connection and understanding that storytelling can convey. New technologies such as the big data revolution, data visualization, and data analytics tools allow us to raise the quality of our stories by backing them up with relevant data.” Ends abruptly — will there be a part 2?

Lifehacker: The Best Podcasts for Discovering New Music. “I like to discover my music anywhere but the radio: playlists, TV soundtracks, best-of lists, subway bands, TikToks, overheard songs in bars and stores and coffeeshops…and podcasts. What a fantastic medium for trying out new music. A music podcast is like your favorite radio show on demand—and of course many of the best are simply rebroadcasts of actual radio shows, with quieter commercials and no wacky morning DJs. These are my favorite shows for discovering new and new-to-me music, or re-discovering old favorites.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

WBIR: ‘Rising from the Ashes’ | UT library begins project to document Gatlinburg wildfire experiences. “Nearly three years after the Gatlinburg wildfires, University of Tennessee librarians have started work on a special project to archive that history. It’s expected to take up to three years to complete. The purpose is to speak with people who were impacted by the fire and preserve their experiences for the future.”

Forge Today: The rise of made-for-Instagram exhibits: How social media is shaping art and the way you experience it. “The desire for content has contributed to the recent success of ‘experiences’ within the industry, where exhibitions are judged for their ‘Instagramability’ and how well they photograph. The general rule appears to be the more aesthetic or interesting the exhibition, the more traction it receives, with the worldwide success of Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirror Rooms (there are currently 838k photos with the tag #yayoikusama on Instagram) or the Guggenheim’s America (a golden toilet recently stolen from Blenheim Palace after 100,000 people waited to use it) often used as prime examples.”

SECURITY & LEGAL

New York Times: Cruise Line Bars Woman Who Climbed on Balcony Railing for Selfie. “A photograph taken this week on a Caribbean cruise ship quickly gained widespread attention but it wasn’t of a pink-sand beach, a zip-lining adventure or an onboard skydiving simulator. It was of a woman standing on a balcony railing of her stateroom on one of the world’s largest cruise ships — posing for a selfie.”

RESEARCH & OPINION

Globe and Mail: Facebook reduces transparency of information on political-ad targeting. “The company is asking users to complete a ‘captcha’ – a visual challenge that asks people to pick out similar items in a photo or type out a sequence of letters and numbers, for example. These captchas are preventing tools designed to monitor users’ feeds from automatically collecting ad-targeting information. The impact of the captchas on the tool’s ability to collect targeting information is significant. In August, more than 86 per cent of ads collected had targeting information. Since the federal election campaign began, that number has dropped to 16 per cent.”

TechCrunch: Facebook isn’t free speech, it’s algorithmic amplification optimized for outrage. “The problem is that Facebook doesn’t offer free speech; it offers free amplification. No one would much care about anything you posted to Facebook, no matter how false or hateful, if people had to navigate to your particular page to read your rantings, as in the very early days of the site. But what people actually read on Facebook is what’s in their News Feed … and its contents, in turn, are determined not by giving everyone an equal voice, and not by a strict chronological timeline.” Good evening, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Drone Deliveries, Genealogy Photography, Sound Effects, More: Monday Afternoon ResearchBuzz, October

https://researchbuzz.me/2019/10/21/drone-deliveries-genealogy-photography-sound-effects-more-monday-afternoon-researchbuzz-october-21-2019/

http://researchbuzz.me/?p=16667

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Engadget: Alphabet’s Wing starts drone deliveries to US homes. “Alphabet’s Wing has started making deliveries by drone to homes in the US for the first time. During a pilot program in Christiansburg, Virginia, drones will drop off packages from FedEx, Walgreens and local retailer Sugar Magnolia, which include over-the-counter medication, snacks and gifts.”

USEFUL STUFF

Genealogy’s Star: Photography Basics for Genealogists: Part One: Orientation. “Genealogists accumulate a lot of photos and those who travel and do onsite research end up taking a lot of photographs also. We also accumulate a lot of photos from our family activities. This new series is going to discuss all of the aspects of photography from cameras and lenses to the planning and making of the photograph itself and on to the preservation and display of photo collections. I am going to start out with an example of what can happen to make a poor quality image.”

Hongkiat: 50 Sites to Download Free Sound Effects for Almost Everything. “There are thousands of online resources to download sound effects, however, not all of them can offer you high-quality material that’s also free. So, in this post, I am listing 50+ cool websites to download just about any type of sound effect for free.” Good annotation for such a long list.

How-To Geek: How to Share a Google Docs, Sheets, or Slides File as a Web Page. “With Google Drive, you can share any Google file (from Docs, Sheets, or Slides) online as a web page for anyone to see. You can even share simple HTML files to act as your site’s landing page. Here’s how to do it.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

NBC News: Anti-vaccination groups still crowdfunding on Facebook despite crackdown. “Activists planning to line California roadways with anti-vaccination billboards full of misinformation are paying for them through Facebook fundraisers, despite a platform-wide crackdown on such campaigns.”

Brisbane Times: Iconic Stratocaster launches Powerhouse Museum’s virtual collection. “In the summer of 1963, Jan and Dean and The Beach Boys were top of the pops and so too were Australian surf band The Atlantics with a twangy surf instrumental that made its four band members household names. Fame proved fleeting with The Beatles soon to dominate the music charts but the red Fender Stratocaster used to create that unique reverberated sound is one of the first culturally significant objects in the Powerhouse Museum collection to be digitised.”

SECURITY & LEGAL

ZDNet: WAV audio files are now being used to hide malicious code. “The first of these two new malware campaigns abusing WAV files was reported back in June. Symantec security researchers said they spotted a Russian cyber-espionage group known as Waterbug (or Turla) using WAV files to hide and transfer malicious code from their server to already-infected victims.”

Channel NewsAsia: Kidney for sale: How organs can be bought via social media in the Philippines. “In the second of a two part series looking at the illegal trade in human organs in the Philippines, CNA’s Pichayada Promchertchoo investigated how social media is an essential tool for many of those involved in the lucrative business.”

RESEARCH & OPINION

TechCrunch: AI is helping scholars restore ancient Greek texts on stone tablets. “Machine learning and AI may be deployed on such grand tasks as finding exoplanets and creating photorealistic people, but the same techniques also have some surprising applications in academia: DeepMind has created an AI system that helps scholars understand and recreate fragmentary ancient Greek texts on broken stone tablets.”

BoingBoing: You can purchase science fiction novels written by artificial intelligence. “Even the covers to this collection of AI-written science fiction novels were created by AI. The reviews are also written by AI. Titles include Bitches of the Points, Auro-Minds and the Hungers, The Table in 10, and Breath Chanter.” Good afternoon, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

German Techno Mixes, US Constitution, Huntington Museum of Art, More: Monday ResearchBuzz, October 2

https://researchbuzz.me/2019/10/21/german-techno-mixes-us-constitution-huntington-museum-of-art-more-monday-researchbuzz-october-21-2019/

http://researchbuzz.me/?p=16663

NEW RESOURCES

DJ Magazine: Listen To This 239GB Archive Of German Techno Mixes. “A huge library of German techno mixes has been shared online. You can listen to it below. The mixes are taken from the Hr3 and XXL Clubnight radio programs, which ran out of Frankfurt from 1990 through until 2014.”

The Daily Universe: BYU Law creates language database to help interpret Constitution. BYU is Brigham Young University. “This database is called the Corpus of Founding Era American English, also known as COFEA. ‘Corpus’ refers to a collection of written texts on a particular subject. The corpus holds founding-era documents that can be used by legal professionals for free as a tool to make educated legal decisions.”

Herald-Dispatch: Online database allows visitors to explore museum collection. “The Huntington Museum of Art has added the PastPerfect collections database to its website so that visitors can explore thousands of objects in HMA’s permanent art holdings. ‘The Huntington Museum of Art owns more than 16,000 art objects and the PastPerfect collections database will allow visitors to search for individual pieces of artwork to learn more about each one,’ said HMA Registrar Linda Sanns, whose job duties include maintaining records and locations for the thousands of objects in HMA’s care.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

University of Arkansas: Textbooks by University of Arkansas Faculty Added to Open Textbook Library. “Three openly licensed textbooks written by University of Arkansas faculty are now available in the Open Textbook Library.” The new textbooks cover physics, astronomy, and technical writing.

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Washington Post: On Facebook’s live stream, Zuckerberg’s free-speech lecture got a big thumbs up. “During Mark Zuckerberg’s live-streamed speech on the dangers of censorship on Facebook, viewers saw a flood of almost entirely positive comments and emoji. The Facebook chief executive’s speech also received plenty of negative responses, but most were not visible during the talk because of how the algorithms behind a live stream with tens of thousands of viewers work.”

Cornell Chronicle: Five projects awarded 2019 digitization grants. “Cornell University Library’s Grants Program for Digital Collections in Arts and Sciences transforms fragile artifacts into lasting online collections for teaching and research. This year, the program has awarded funding to five projects representing a range of study, from unearthing a vanished hamlet in Enfield Falls, New York, to examining modern art in Indonesia.”

Military .com: Social Media OpSec Concerns Overstated, Army General Says. “A one-star general, an Army lieutenant, a popular cartoonist and the formerly anonymous administrator of a controversial community Facebook page walk onto a stage. It’s not the setup of an elaborate joke, but the foundation of a deeply nontraditional panel discussion at the Association of the United States Army’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C. And it came with some very nontraditional advice.”

SECURITY & LEGAL

Des Moines Register: CenturyLink reports customer information exposed after 2.8 million records leaked. “A tech company with Iowa offices warns customers of leaked personal information, according to a CenturyLink Inc. email obtained by the Register. An incident with a third-party vendor led to customers’ personal information becoming public, according to the email sent to customers, including name, address, phone number and CenturyLink account number.”

The Register: Not a good look, Google: Pixel 4 mobes can be face-unlocked even if you’re asleep… or dead? . “Pixel 4 owners can unlock their smartphones with their faces even if they have their eyes closed. That’s not good. Google’s Face Unlock feature in the new smartphone uses machine-learning algorithms to recognize your face and grant access to the device’s apps and data. The biometric system is designed to ensure that only you can only unlock your own phone.”

The Next Web: Researchers find fake WordPress plugins that secretly mine cryptocurrency. “Researchers have discovered several malicious WordPress plugins that are being used to surreptitiously mine cryptocurrency by running Linux binary code.”

RESEARCH & OPINION

Carnegie Mellon University: CMU Team Uses AI to Help Machines Play Nice with Humans. “The researchers received a $2.8 million DARPA grant to study team collective intelligence and the theory of mind involving human and machine interactions. Team collective intelligence relates to the ability of a team to work together across a range of tasks. Theory of the mind explores how a person can understand what others are thinking, and how they may react to something, based on subtle nonverbal cues.”

The Star: U of T Indigenous-led lab creates new app for reporting pollution in Chemical Valley. “Vanessa and Beze Gray run an annual ‘Toxic Tour’ of the siblings’ childhood home — Aamjiwnaang First Nation. The 2,500 acres of ancestral land is wedged on three sides by sprawling petroleum and chemical companies that, for generations, have discharged pollutants into Canada’s Chemical Valley.”

Haaretz: Magic or a Trap? DNA Changes Study of the Past. “The ability to extract and sequence DNA from samples that are thousands and even hundreds of thousands of years old has led to significant breakthroughs in the study of evolution. By sequencing Neanderthal genomes, scientists have learned about the health, physical appearance and settlement patterns of Neanderthals. Even more important, DNA research led to the discovery of formerly unknown hominids…. These successes led researches to apply genetic tools to later periods, and according to some critics that is where the danger lies.” Good morning, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Rules of Origin, Australia Radio, Pinterest: Sunday ResearchBuzz, October 20, 2019

https://researchbuzz.me/2019/10/20/rules-of-origin-australia-radio-pinterest-sunday-researchbuzz-october-20-2019/

http://researchbuzz.me/?p=16659

NEW RESOURCES

World Trade Organization: New rules of origin initiative to help firms better utilize trade preferences. “Presented to WTO members at a 17 October meeting of the Committee on Rules of Origin, the Rules of Origin Facilitator provides firms with free access to a unique searchable database on duty savings in trade agreements, and the corresponding rules of origin. Users can search the tool by product name or product code, and access original documentation, including certificates of origin.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

AdNews: Australian radio industry links with Google devices. “The agreement between industry body Commercial Radio Australia (CRA) and the tech giant will make more than 300 AM, FM and DAB+ digital radio stations available with simple voice commands across Google Nest devices, including Nest Home and Nest Mini.”

Search Engine Journal: Pinterest Gives Users More Control Over Content on Their Home Feed . “Pinterest is making it easier to control the recommendations users see in their home feed with all-new settings. In addition, users will be able to see the boards, topics, followed accounts, and recent history that contribute to the recommendations shown in their home feed.”

WTOP: Facebook reaches licensing deal with News Corp for headlines. “News Corp. says it has reached a licensing deal with Facebook that lets the social network feature headlines from The Wall Street Journal, the New York Post and other publications on its upcoming news section.”

TechCrunch: TikTok makes education push in India. “China’s TikTok today launched an education program in India as the popular short-video app looks to expand its offering and assuage local authority in one of its biggest markets. This is the first time TikTok has launched a program of this kind in any market, a spokesperson told TechCrunch.”

USEFUL STUFF

MakeUseOf: 7 Tips to Help You Waste Less Time on Social Media . “This guide is aimed at those who still wish to keep social media in their lives while managing their time and energy better. From apps that help direct your time to following healthier social media content, we have a few tricks to keep you positive and ready for every day.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Irish Times: Marian Keyes becomes first Irish writer to donate digital archive. “The National Library of Ireland (NLI) has announced details of a pilot scheme to expand the ways it collects the ‘born-digital’ story of Ireland – allowing content like videos and digital documents to become part of the national collections. The first to donate part of her digital archive is the author Marian Keyes following a request from the library.”

Fast Company: Supply-chain sources say Facebook Portal sales are ‘very low’. “Surprise, surprise. Facebook’s Portal video-chat device—which puts a camera and a sensitive microphone in your living room—isn’t flying off the shelves, say supply-chain sources and store sales reps. The device, which launched a little over a year ago, has been plagued by the privacy concerns of would-be buyers from the start.”

Ars Technica: When MS Paint ruled the fandom world: An innovative webcomic, 10 years later. “Homestuck is a product of its time. It’s built on media tropes from when it was written, and its aesthetic evolved with the Internet’s tastes, from jokes about TV shows and adventure games to social media and anime references as the story wrapped up in 2013. But one thing that remained constant and set a tone for how creators would operate online in the years that followed is the tight-knit relationship between Homestuck’s author and his fans.”

SECURITY & LEGAL

The Register: Deus ex hackina: It took just 10 minutes to find data-divulging demons corrupting Pope’s Click to Pray eRosary app. “The technology behind the Catholic Church’s latest innovation, an electronic rosary, is so insecure, it can be trivially hacked to siphon off worshipers’ personal information.” The article also notes that the issues are “more embarrassing than life-threatening.”

Techdirt: California Governor Signs Bill Banning Facial Recognition Tech Use By State’s Law Enforcement Agencies. “The ban blocks the use of facial recognition tech by state law enforcement until the end of 2022. It also blocks the use of other biometric surveillance tech and prevents law enforcement from using existing biometric data to feed any predictive policing tools agencies might be using or planning on implementing.”

RESEARCH & OPINION

ScienceDaily: Use of social media is taking place both online and offline. “Social media has changed how people interact. However, social media use is neither static or specifically linked to certain platforms. Emerging technical capabilities, changes in lifestyle and time management as well as the increasing possibilities to engage in online and offline interaction simultaneously affect our use of social media.” Good morning, Internet…

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Europol’s Most Wanted, Google Books, Online Gambling: Saturday ResearchBuzz, October 19, 2019

https://researchbuzz.me/2019/10/19/europols-most-wanted-google-books-online-gambling-saturday-researchbuzz-october-19-2019/

http://researchbuzz.me/?p=16655

NEW RESOURCES

The Guardian: Campaign launched to catch ‘Europe’s most wanted women’. “Europe’s policing agency has launched a campaign to catch the continent’s most wanted female criminals. Europol’s new website, called the Crime Has No Gender campaign, reveals the faces of fugitives wanted by 21 EU countries in an interactive way. Eighteen of them are women.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Google Blog: 15 years of Google Books. “Today we’re unveiling a new design for Google Books on desktop and helpful features for anyone looking to read, research or simply hunt for literary treasures. We’ve redesigned Google Books so people can now quickly access details like the book’s description, author’s history and other works, reader reviews and options for where you can purchase or borrow the book. And for those using Google Books for research, each book’s bibliographies are located prominently on the page and the citation tool allows you to cite the source in your preferred format, all in one spot.”

University of Georgia: UGA partners with Google Books for digital access. “University of Georgia Libraries’ books will soon transcend shelves and be available online to students, faculty and members of the community in Athens and around the world. Through a new partnership with Google, about 120,000 of the Libraries’ 4.5 million volumes will be digitized, allowing further access to literary, historic, scientific and reference books and journals through UGA’s library catalog as well as one of the largest digital book collections in the world.” Genealogists with Georgia roots, keep an eye on this — one of the categories of items being digitized is city directories.

Gambling .com: Online Casinos Can Advertise on Google in 2020 as Ban Ends. “Google is getting ready to change its advertising policies around the evolving U.S. gambling landscape. The company plans to ease up on online casino advertising and get rid of a sweeping ban on the industry, according to an report from EGR.”

USEFUL STUFF

TechCrunch: A set of new tools can decrypt files locked by Stop, a highly active ransomware. “New Zealand-based security company Emsisoft has built a set of decryption tools for Stop, a family of ransomware that includes Djvu and Puma, which they say could help victims recover some of their files. Stop is believed to be the most active ransomware in the world, accounting for more than half of all ransomware infections, according to figures from ID-Ransomware, a free site that helps identify infections.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Columbia Journalism Review: India had its first ‘WhatsApp election.’ We have a million messages from it. “At the Tow Center for Digital Journalism, we used the Indian election cycle, which ran between April 11 and May 19, 2019, as a case study for assessing both general political discourse and information manipulation on WhatsApp. With no APIs, tools, or best practices in place to help outsiders tap into ongoing activity inside closed groups, we devised a strategy to monitor a subset of the political conversation, over a period of three and a half months. The study’s resulting data set—which grew to over a terabyte in size—contains 1.09 million messages, retrieved by joining 1,400 chat groups related to politics in the country.”

The Register: Yahoo! Groups’ closure and a tale of Oftel: Die-hard users ‘informally’ included telcos. “The tossing away of user-generated content on Yahoo!’s long-running Groups site on Wednesday was not just bad news for all the hardcore users who are about to lose all their precious things stored there. Many were quick to point at telcos, who were using Yahoo! Groups to manage phone number assignments.” WOW.

SECURITY & LEGAL

ZDNet: Google is in serious trouble, warns top anti-trust lawyer. “Seth Bloom, former general counsel to the Senate Antitrust Subcommittee and former attorney at the Justice Department Antitrust Division, said Google is ‘in serious trouble’ regarding anti-trust scrutiny from many different places.”

Digital Trends: Lawsuit alleges Equifax’s stupid password made it super easy to steal your data. “The first of those issues comes in the form of the password the company users to protect a portal used to manage credit disputes. While you might think a major company holding personal information like people’s names, addresses, and social security numbers might use an exceptionally secure password in that instance, it actually went for something a different: It used ‘admin’ as both the username and password for the portal.” This is me, my blood pressure zooming up, my eyes bugging out…

Ars Technica: Unpatched Linux bug may open devices to serious attacks over Wi-Fi. “A potentially serious vulnerability in Linux may make it possible for nearby devices to use Wi-Fi signals to crash or fully compromise vulnerable machines, a security researcher said.”

RESEARCH & OPINION

New York University: Combination of Artificial Intelligence & Radiologists More Accurately Identified Breast Cancer. “An artificial intelligence (AI) tool—trained on roughly a million screening mammography images—has identified breast cancer with approximately 90 percent accuracy when combined with analysis by radiologists.”

Mashable: The ‘Internet of Things’ can’t stop killing my gadgets. “The internet of things is more than just Alexa, and its weak point is more than just privacy. We’re talking about hundreds of devices performing every conceivable labor-saving function. Now, at the end of what was supposed to be the IoT decade, these gadgets are already starting to do what was always more likely, the mundane thing that technology has pretty much always done: either break down and leave us stranded, or effectively extort more money from us, after we’ve been foolish enough to start relying on them.” Good morning, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Credit Cards, 1918 Flu Epidemic,Yahoo Groups: Friday Afternoon ResearchBuzz, October 18, 2019

https://researchbuzz.me/2019/10/18/credit-cards-1918-flu-epidemicyahoo-groups-friday-afternoon-researchbuzz-october-18-2019/

http://researchbuzz.me/?p=16649

NEW RESOURCES

MarketWatch: New CFPB database of expensive prepaid cards is missing key information, advocates say. “The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has launched a new database revealing the terms and conditions on prepaid cards and payroll cards that can sometimes hit users with high fees. But people wouldn’t know that from the federal watchdog agency, consumer advocates say.”

WHYY: ‘Up close and personal’: Mütter Museum maps the spread of Philly’s 1918 flu epidemic. “When the Mütter Museum began looking into the historic epidemic five years ago, it discovered a trove of information in archives around the city, including tens of thousands of death certificates. Part of the project was to create a public online database of all those death certificates and place them on an interactive map. Users can search by name or neighborhood to track how the flu swept the city.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

The Verge: Yahoo will give you an extra week to post on Yahoo Groups, says it will ‘listen to feedback’. “Yahoo’s plan to largely shut down Groups was widely publicized on October 16th, just days before the company was going to freeze uploads on October 21st. But today, the company told us that date is actually going to be a bit later, on October 28th. (It has also added the new date to its support document about the decision.) However, no matter when you post something to a group, it’s still going to get deleted, as Yahoo is still removing all content hosted on Groups on December 14th.”

TechCrunch: Farewell, Google Clips. “Amid a slew of updated hardware, Clips has gone missing from Google’s online store. Odds are you probably don’t remember what Clips is. If you do, odds are you’re not surprised by this turn of events.”

BetaNews: KB4517389 is causing even more problems with Windows 10 than first thought. “That Microsoft’s updates for Windows 10 have been problematic is hardly a revelation, but the scale of the problems just keeps on growing. We have already written about numerous bug-ridden updates, including KB4517389 breaking the Start menu and Edge. Now this same update is being blamed for display issues and random BSODs.”

USEFUL STUFF

MakeUseOf: How to Download Books From Google Books. “Google offers a vast repository of ebooks via Google Books. There’s the Google Books search engine and Google Play Books store. Both services let you save copies of books so you can read them offline. So here’s how to download books from Google Books.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

BBC: Lebanon scraps WhatsApp tax as protests rage. “The Lebanese government has backtracked on plans to tax WhatsApp calls as protests rage over the government’s handling of an economic crisis. It had announced a new $0.20 (£0.16) daily charge on voice calls made through Facebook-owned WhatsApp and other similar apps.”

New York Times: Defiant Zuckerberg Says Facebook Won’t Police Political Speech. “In a winding, 35-minute speech at Georgetown University’s Gaston Hall — where presidents and foreign heads of state have delivered addresses — Mr. Zuckerberg fought back against the idea that the social network needed to be an arbiter of speech. He said that Facebook had been founded to give people a voice and bring them together, and that critics who had assailed the company for doing so were setting a dangerous example.”

SECURITY & LEGAL

CNN: New privacy bill threatens years of jail time for companies that misuse consumer data. “The bill, known as the Mind Your Own Business Act, threatens to put top executives behind bars for up to 20 years if their companies are caught lying to authorities about having misused Americans’ personal information. It also proposes that those companies face special tax penalties tied to executive salary.”

RESEARCH & OPINION

Tech Xplore: Telescope: a tool to manage bioinformatics analyses on mobile devices. “A team of researchers at UCLA, the University of São Paulo, the Federal University of São Carlos and the University of Southern California has recently developed an interactive tool for managing large-scale bioinformatic analyses in real-time and from portable devices. This new tool, called Telescope, was first presented in a paper pre-published on arXiv.” Good afternoon, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Art Fairs, Feedly, Google: Friday ResearchBuzz, October 18, 2019

https://researchbuzz.me/2019/10/18/art-fairs-feedly-google-friday-researchbuzz-october-18-2019/

http://researchbuzz.me/?p=16645

NEW RESOURCES

PR Newswire: New Website artfairmag.com Slated to Become Benchmark Site for Information on Art Fairs (PRESS RELEASE). “Art fairs appeal to collectors, dealers, curators, artists and art lovers alike, showcasing a wide range of genres. Over the last two decades, fairs have become the key element of the international art market and their number has increased from around 50 to almost 400 all over the world. artfairmag.com aims to give art fairs greater visibility, promoting not only large, well-established shows, but also regional, young and emergent ones.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Feedly Blog: Hey Google, Talk to Feedly. “Have you ever wished Google Assistant could read you the articles in your Feedly? Now it can. Nick Felker has created a Google Assistant Action that integrates Google Assistant and Feedly.”

Search Engine Land: Google may be having issues showing new content again. “Google seems to be having issues showing new and fresh content from web sites and publishers. This seems to be impacting both large and small publishers, including the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, CNN and even this site, Search Engine Land.” Man, this seems to be happening *a lot*…

CNN: Giphy feature lets anyone develop games without knowing how to code. “The free new feature, called Giphy Arcade, runs on a web browser and features about 100 games. People can play these original titles or customize their own with the help of 10 templates, music and stickers. The games, which are about 10 seconds in length and feature retro-style graphics, can be shared with friends.”

USEFUL STUFF

MakeUseOf: 8 Obscure Social Media Apps for When You Get Bored . “After a while, mainstream social media apps like Instagram or Snapchat can get a little boring. So wouldn’t it be nice to try something new? As always, we’re here to help. That’s why we’ve found the best obscure social media apps that you can use to meet new people in new ways.” Some of these do look pretty interesting…

TechCrunch: This brilliant app waits on hold for you. “DoNotPay helps you get out of parking tickets and cancel forgotten subscriptions, and now it can call you when it’s your turn in a customer service phone queue. The app today is launching ‘Skip Waiting On Hold.’ Just type in the company you need to talk to, and DoNotPay calls for you using tricks to get a human on the line quickly. Then it calls you back and connects you to the agent so you never have to listen to that annoying hold music.” It’s not free, but $3 a month could pay for itself depending on how often you have to wait on hold.

Social Media Examiner: How to Use YouTube and Instagram to Establish Authority. “Want to be known as the expert in your field? Wondering how video on Instagram and YouTube can help? To explore how to build rapport with any audience using YouTube and Instagram Stories, I interview Amanda Horvath on the Social Media Marketing Podcast.” I liked the tips on how to present a polished YouTube presence.

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Route Fifty: The Legislative Push to Bring Back Cursive. “Loop the T, hold the pen just so, practice writing, ‘The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog’: if legislators in Wisconsin have their way, elementary school students will soon become versed in the lost art of cursive handwriting instruction.”

Berkeley Library News: Rock ‘n’ roll, clowns, and Roberta Flack: An inside look at a massive new collection of music photography at The Bancroft Library. “Looking through the photographs is like flipping through stacks of vinyl at Amoeba Music, a satisfying exercise in nostalgia. Scanning through the folders, you’ll see Judy Collins, Elvis Costello, Bonnie Raitt, Neil Young, and so many in between… The photographs, 60,000 in all, make up the Howard Brainen photo archive. A recent gift to Bancroft, the archive is a time machine into a moment in music history, offering a glimpse into the local scene and the larger-than-life figures who came through the Bay Area.” It’s worth reading the article just to see the pictures included with it.

SECURITY & LEGAL

ZDNet: Linux security hole: Much sudo about nothing. “At first glance the problem looks like a bad one. With it, a user who is allowed to use sudo to run commands as any other user, except root, can still use it to run root commands. For this to happen, several things must be set up just wrong.”

Geek: UK Abandons Controversial Porn Age Checks. “The U.K. government has ditched plans to age-check visitors to pornographic websites and apps. The policy, part of 2017’s Digital Economy Act (DEA), was designed to protect minors from accessing adult content.”

RESEARCH & OPINION

Straits Times: National AI database gains 1,000 hours of local English voice samples. “Speech apps and tools such as voice transcription apps could soon be able to pick up Singapore English more accurately, as their developers can now access better data from an expanded corpus of local speech. Some 1,000 hours of natural conversations on topics such as favourite foods and holidays have been added to the National Speech Corpus (NSC), an artificial intelligence (AI) database of locally accented speech maintained by the Infocomm Media Development Authority (IMDA).” Good morning, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!